IamCalvinBrown.com a Blog Site

Code Examples, Consulting Advice and lots of other cool things

What to Look for When Hiring for DevOps Jobs


Calvin Brown is the DevOps Architect & Lead Developer for Kairu Consulting, LLC.

“The most important things to look for in both developers and operations persons (DevOps) is…”

How much they know about the other areas of the project. To explain, a project consists of these 3 elements: what the user sees, the code that runs, and the platform(s) that it runs on. That’s also usually broken into 3 careers: graphics, developers, and operations.

A good developer would know how to release their product to the world and how to check for security vulnerabilities, deploy machines, and use some of the same tools as the operations team. True, this is two career paths, but consultants like myself who must deliver a product online for our customers to see (and pay for) must know the basics of operations. The same is true for operations folks. Knowing how to build the code for release, write basic scripts, and deploy code is critical in today’s environment. The Cloud (especially Amazon AWS) makes this more of a reality. If a developer says they use AWS and understand EC2, they’re DevOps types of guys (and ladies). If operations candidates know CI/CD (continuous integration/continuous deployment), then they’re likely DevOps ready as well.

(original article available on Stackify at http://bit.ly/2xMas4k )

Smart answers for your next DevOps interview: How to prepare


General queries

What is DevOps?

Your response should reflect your knowledge of the main theme common to any DevOps effort: It’s about operationalizing and deploying software and services with greater speed, agility, and flexibility.

Point out that the “smooth deployment of software is what DevOps attempts to codify,” says Calvin Brown, enterprise architect and founder of custom software development and consulting firm Kairu Consulting. Comment on how the core of DevOps lies with components such as an agile relationship between software development and IT operations, the management of security and software development processes for improved release efficiency, and the automation of tasks, he says.

Read the full article on TechBeacon.com at http://bit.ly/2uFP6mg

(repost from the original article on TechBeacon.com)

Why good consultants are rarely available


“Where are you in your career,” a question asked often by recruiters.
 
As an Enterprise consultant, I often find these types of questions, generic and humorous. Seriously! What consultant or consultancy, with a myriad of skills, is randomly available on a Tuesday? If they are, this is a red flag. We are never not working on a project (or 10) and in the bidding process for others. Certainly, some projects are cancelled or budgets are cut, however, we are never idle. At least not the good guys.

According to a poll conducted by CNN Money, there are 5.8 million IT jobs available. With this insight, I have asked several of my colleagues if they have encountered these types of questions. 95% of them say this is a regularly occurring question and they share the same sentiment. I believe the future of solid IT skills will be scheduled in advance, like buying a Tesla or Koenigsegg 1-to-1. I'm left to think and wonder; is the current style of finding good talent antiquated, and in alignment with the "good ole days", where you could bill unlimited fees, travel, and get per diem and expenses approved with only knowing your manager really well? Or, are we looking to update and shift paradigms as quickly as technology itself shifts.


http://money.cnn.com/2015/09/09/news/economy/us-economy-job-openings/